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piglet

Sick calf is on the brink of death, but loving piglet refuses to give up hope

This story is about a piglet named Baby nursing a sick calf back to health. The two share an unusually friendship, but adorable nonetheless. report this ad When Kelly Nelder found the calf, he was in bad shape. The animal was weak, didn’t move, and severely underweight. Nelder says the first time she approached the …

This story is about a piglet named Baby nursing a sick calf back to health. The two share an unusually friendship, but adorable nonetheless.

When Kelly Nelder found the calf, he was in bad shape. The animal was weak, didn’t move, and severely underweight. Nelder says the first time she approached the animal in his dirt pen, the calf barely even lifted his head.


The Dodo Screenshot

To give some back story, this male calf was born on a dairy farm in New South Wales, Australia. In the dairy industry, male calves are viewed as “waste products”  and are often times slaughtered (considered waste because only female cows can produce milk).

When a woman living in Sydney heard about the calf, she offered to adopt him. Although her intentions were good, the lady didn’t exactly know how to take care of the calf. This resulted in the baby calf losing weight when it should have been gaining weight.


The Dodo Screenshot

Nelder is the founder of Sugarshrine Farm Sanctuary near Lismore, Australia. She  coincidentally came across the calf when she was on the woman’s property picking up three pigs (including Baby).

Nelder stepped into the lady’s back yard and saw the small calf in the dirt pen.  After some talking, the woman agreed to give the calf to Nelder, along with her three pigs.

Nelder took the calf home and named him “Bunny.”  Nelder says,  “He slept on a little mattress inside the sunroom, but he was very uncomfortable. He was weak and in pain, and he couldn’t settle.”